Category: Arduino

Projects relating to the wonderful Arduino.

Speech-Controlled Arduino Robot

For the second Carlitos’ Project, implant I wanted to do something a bit more “useful” than pretty lights. So I decided that a speech controlled Arduino robot should be interesting enough as a project.

Speech-Controlled Arduino Robot
Speech-Controlled Arduino Robot

For this project, I used the DFRobotShop Rover (a mobile Arduino kit), the VRbot speech recognition module by Veear, two XBee modules, an Arduino Uno, two XBee shields and some other components. see the video below to learn how to do your own.

[youtube cKY9tpxtkvE]

In order to get more information about the project, the required tools, materials and code, please visit the Speech-Controlled Arduino  Robot project page at GoRobotics.net. The code is also available over there.

If you are interested in making your own, have a look at the kit we put together with RobotShop.

So what about Nao?

I have been terribly Nao-centric for a while and this it not going to change today. While programming the robot, it can become very frustrating to say the commands over and over again. For this reason and also in order to produce a perfectly repeatable input, I programmed Nao 1337 to say the commands for me (yes , I am lazy, I know). See the video below to see how Nao performed.

Arduino-controlled RGB LED Mood Cube

RobotShop in collaboration with Carlitos’ Contraptions is creating a series of videos about DIY electronic and robotic projects.

For these projects, here I’ll be putting together some electronic kits along with instructional blog posts and videos at GoRobotics.net. The main idea is to create more complex gadgets form off-the-shelf components.

So far, dosage I have some projects in mind such as an LED mood cube, a mini automation web-server, and a speech-controlled robot to name a few.

Stay tuned for the upcoming projects.
As the first Carlitos’ Project, viagra order I put together a 4x4x4 RGB LED Mood Cube. This cube is composed of 64 RGB LEDs that can generate any colour you can imagine.

RGB LED Mood Cube
RGB LED Mood Cube

The main idea is to display colourful patterns and nice animations in this 3D LED matrix. In order to do so, glands the LEDs are controlled by a Rainbowduino, the lovechild of an Arduino and an LED driver.  The Rainbowduino can power up to 192 LEDs which is exactly the number required for this project (4x4x4x3 = 192).

See the instructional video below if you want to put together a cube of your own. Be prepared to watch me do a lot of soldering at 10x speed.

[youtube _-zgh6amwbM#]

In order to access the full instructions and documentation for this project please visit the RGB LED Mood Cube project page it put together over at GoRobotics.net.

RGB LED Mood Cube Kit
RGB LED Mood Cube Kit

If you want to make your own cube and are prepared to solder a lot, you might want to have a look at the full RGB LED Mood Cube Kit we put together at RobotShop.

Arduino POV Prototype – Part 2

Recently my girlfriend got rid of her cable television connection and moved to a cheaper (almost free) and fully featured media center solution (i.e. Xbox + Xbox Media Center).
Meterials

  • Xbox (not 360)
  • Xbox remote (not required, hygiene psychiatrist but useful)
  • Xbox Controller (usually comes with the Xbox)
  • Xbox memory card (8 MB is enough)
  • Modded Xbox from a relative (for a one time use)
  • MechAssault game disk
  • Softmod installer
  • Computer, router, high speed internet connection, electricity (you should already have these).

General Idea
The idea is to unlock the Xbox, which is basically a very cheep computer, in order to run the very excellent and free Xbox Media Center (XBMC), a very advanced media player. Then, the Xbox can be use to watch videos, play music, stream content from the internet, and more (all in the comfort of the living room).

I know XBMC has been around for many years now, but I think is a good idea to write a post to show off its incredible features and explain how to get it.

How to do it
First, get all the materials. My girlfriend and I got a second hand Xbox complete with a remote and a controller for 100$ at Comptant.com after searching around a lot for a good deal. Then, I got a Mechassault original (not the platinum edition) game disk for 9$ and an 8MB memory card for 10$ (all second hand). So we spent a total of 120$ (much cheaper than any commercial media center).

In order to get the Xbox to run homebrew software (i.e. software that is not signed by Microsoft such as XBMC) its security system must be disabled. This can be done by installing a softmod (witch doesn’t require any hardware modification of the gaming system).

I choose to use the Krayzie Ndure SOFTMOD Pack that can be downloaded from the torrents. The idea is to get one of the game saves from this package (depending on which game you want to use) into the memory card and then into the Xbox. In order to get the MechAssault save to the memory card I used my own (hard)modded Xbox: I copied the game save folder to the E:UDATA folder trough FTP and then I copied the game save (named Linux Installer) to the memory card by using the original Xbox dash. If you don’t have access to a modded Xbox, there are other ways of getting the save to the Xbox such as Action Replay or building a USB adapter.

Now, the easy part. Once you have the game save in the memory card, connect the Xbox to the router (as you would connect any other computer to it), plug the card into the controller, and turn the console on. Then, in the Xbox dash, go to the memory menu and copy the game save to the Xbox hard drive (hdd). Afterwards, insert the MechAssault disk, select the campaign menu entry, and then select “Linux Installer”. This will take you to a dashboard that will guide you through the installation of the softmod. Simply follow the steps (back up the eeprom and install the softmod) and in less than 2 minutes you will have a modded Xbox with your dashboard of choice (you can chose between EvolutionX or UnleashedX).

Now you can play game backups, run unsigned software and much more. Note that you need to update the Xbox dash to the latest version in order for the softmod installer to work properly. This can be done by using the “Live” menu entry in the Xbox dash.

Now that the Xbox is modded, you need to install XBMC. I used the latest Pimped version that comes with all the features you would want (codecs, scripts, visualizations, skins) and can be downloaded from the torrents. Once you have it downloaded and unziped, you must copy the XBMC folder to E:/apps in the Xbox’s hdd (the usual applications folder) through FTP (sending files trough FTP is the standard way of installing application onto the Xbox).

For FTP communication with the Xbox you can use any FTP client you want (I use Konqueror). In order to connect to the Xbox you need to know its IP address (which is normally shown on the main menu of the evolution dashboard) and its user name (Xbox) and password (Xbox). for further information in connecting to the Xbox trough FTP, please see this site.

Once the XBMC folder has been copied to E:/apps, reboot the Xbox (this will update the dashboard menu), and go to the applications menu an chose Xbox Media Center in order to start this wonderful program. You can also set it to start automatically (I recommend this) by following this guide.

Now that you have XBMC up , running and connected to the internet you can:

  • play videos/music/pictures stored on any computer connected to router trough SMB (windows network) or stored in the local hd (it support almost all audio/video formats known to man).
  • Play PAL and NTSC DVDs/VCDs from any region.
  • Stream media from the internet, including tv shows, podcasts, movies, music, music videos, and much more.
  • Check the weather forecast.
  • And tons of other cool things.
Some Screenshots(note that the top and bottom black borders are not shown in the TV screen)

Final Remarks
Don’t forget to configure XBMC to adjust it to your needs (I recommend using the MC360 skin). For further information about using XBMC please consult the user’s manual.

You have now a very powerful media center that is far superior than any of the commercial alternatives I know. Enjoy.

Besides, you may also want to install some other great application such as dvd2xbox, which allows to backup entire games to the Xbox hdd, and boXplorer, an excellent file manager. You can get them from the usual places.
For my birthday my girlfriend got me 4 Bare-Bone Boards (from the Modern Devices Company). The boards are fully featured Arduino clones. The only difference with the original Arduino (AFAIK) is that they are cheaper (15$ each or less) and better suited for breadboard connection.

What’s an Arduino?

Arduino is an open-source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, somnology easy-to-use hardware and software. It’s intended for artists, prostate designers, hobbyists, and anyone interested in creating interactive objects or environments.

The Arduino Website

Note that these clones are cheaper because they require a USB-to-TTL serial cable (20 $). The advantage of this approach is that the cable includes the required USB controller chip and can be used to program many boards. In short, you only need to pay for the USB connectivity once and get to use it on as may boards as you want.

Also, I was very (really very) pleased to see that the Arduino software works perfectly under Linux and that there are instructions for installation on all major distros (including Ubuntu) in the Arduino website.
Update: Here are a few extra shots done with my new camera. This is the new Rev. D board.


This is my first attempt to create a persistence of vision (POV) display using the Arduino. The ultimate goal is to mount it on my bike wheel and have it display nice things while I ride. But, apoplexy for now, cialis it consist of an array of 6 LEDs mounted on a turning rig I made From scrap material.

Materials for the rig:

  • 2 old cell phone batteries (found in the garbage) that serve as a counterweight
  • A piece of metal (from an old photocopier) that constitutes the turning blade
  • A fan motor from some sort of broken power supply I found in the UdeM garbage
  • A piece of plastic that makes the base (also from the photocopier)
  • A plastic poster edge (the things used to hold paper posters) that I found in the garbage (it is used to cover the sharp edges of the blade).
  • A heavy metal block that stabilizes the contraption (since it tends to oscillate a bit when it’s turning)
  • A cable with a switch from an IKEA lamp I found in the garbage
  • Lots of cable ties

Materials for the POV circuit:

  • A small breadboard (it came with an electronics magazine)
  • 6 red high power LEDs
  • 6 1 k Ohms resistors
  • A 9V battery w/ battery older

I think the pictures are pretty self explanatory.

The LEDs are directly connected to the pins 2 to 7 of the Arduino and their current is limited by the resistors.
The entire circuit is powered by the 9V battery.

So far I have done some simple patterns for the display and I’ll upload the code soon (it still needs some polish)

I expect to add more LEDs to the design as soon as I get the patterns and the overall code working fine.
The Arduino software is good and works very well under Linux. Nevertheless, neuropathologist it doesn’t create a menu item when installed and it can be tricky to create one for those who are not very used to Linux (like me).

In order to add a KDE menu launcher for the Arduino software, search open the KDE Menu Editor, create a new item and put

cd /opt/arduino-0007/; ./arduino

in the Command field. Also, make sure that Run in terminal is checked and replace /opt/arduino-0007/ by your own installation path.

I’m sure there are thousands of other ways of doing this (including many than only require a few commands in the terminal) but at least this ways is pretty simple and and can be done without knowing that much about Linux.
I polished up the code for my Arduino POV display and I think it is now ready to be shown to the world!

The source code for the POV display can be downloaded here.

The parameters in the code can be changed in order to display other images besides of the default arrows.

Data

The displayed image is stored in the data string. Each drawing is divided in frames (i.e. one frame for each letter of a word) and each frame is divided in columns. The image to be displayed must be encoded into 1s (ON) and 0s (OFF) and each value must be stored in the data string in the order illustrated below.

The duration of each column (i.e. how much time they stay ON), here the spacing between frames and the spacing between images are set respectively by the integers timer1, information pills timer2 and timer3. Keep in mind that their values depend on the rotation speed.

Finally, the number of frames and their length is set respectively by frame_num and frame_len.

Arrow (>):

  • timer1: 3
  • timer2: 15
  • timer3: 0
  • data: {1,0,0,0,0,1, 1,1,0,0,1,1, 0,1,1,1,1,0, 0,0,1,1,0,0}
  • frame_len: 4
  • frame_num: 1

“Alan” (my brother’s name):

  • timer1: 3
  • timer2: 15
  • timer3: 13
  • data: {1,1,1,1,1,1, 1,0,0,1,0,0, 1,0,0,1,0,0, 1,1,1,1,1,1, 1,1,1,1,1,1, 0,0,0,0,0,1, 0,0,0,0,0,1, 0,0,0,0,0,1, 1,1,1,1,1,1, 1,0,0,1,0,0, 1,0,0,1,0,0, 1,1,1,1,1,1, 1,1,1,1,1,1, 0,1,1,0,0,0, 0,0,0,1,1,0, 1,1,1,1,1,1}
  • frame_len: 4
  • frame_num: 4

Sinewave (or girly flower):

  • timer1: 3
  • timer2: 3
  • timer3: 0
  • data: {0,0,1,0,0,0, 0,1,0,0,0,0, 1,0,0,0,0,0, 1,0,0,0,0,0, 0,1,0,0,0,0, 0,0,1,0,0,0, 0,0,0,1,0,0, 0,0,0,0,1,0, 0,0,0,0,0,1, 0,0,0,0,0,1, 0,0,0,0,1,0, 0,0,0,1,0,0}
  • frame_len: 12
  • frame_num: 1

E = MC^2:

  • timer1: 2
  • timer2: 10
  • timer3: 22
  • data: {1,1,1,1,1,1, 1,0,0,1,0,1, 1,0,0,1,0,1, 1,0,0,1,0,1, 1,0,0,1,0,1, 0,0,0,1,0,1, 0,0,0,1,0,1, 0,0,0,1,0,1, 0,0,0,1,0,1, 0,0,0,1,0,1, 1,1,1,1,1,1, 0,1,0,0,0,0, 0,0,1,0,0,0, 0,1,0,0,0,0, 1,1,1,1,1,1, 0,1,1,1,1,0, 1,0,0,0,0,1, 1,0,0,0,0,1, 1,0,0,0,0,1, 0,1,0,0,1,0, 0,1,0,0,1,0, 1,0,0,1,1,0, 1,0,1,0,1,0, 0,1,0,0,1,0, 0,0,0,0,0,0}
  • frame_len: 5
  • frame_num: 5